Is there any way to get snow layers to light up properly?

Is there any way to get snow layers to light up properly? - A Blue Glacier Under The Sun

I've recently been trying to terraform a mountain area using snow layers. However, even in full sunlight, there are weird shadows cropping up making the sides of the blocks seem much darker.

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These ugly dark patches are particularly noticable from a distance:

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The only thing I've been able to work out so far is that it seems to be effected by solid blocks in the vacinity:

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What's going on here and is there any way I can get rid of this unsightly artifact?





Pictures about "Is there any way to get snow layers to light up properly?"

Is there any way to get snow layers to light up properly? - Person in Red Jacket Walking on Snow Covered Ground
Is there any way to get snow layers to light up properly? - People in medical masks strolling on crosswalk near roadway with glowing buses on dark street during winter evening in city
Is there any way to get snow layers to light up properly? - Crowd of people strolling on snowy walkway between road and residential building on street in city during snowfall in winter time



Does Glowstone melt snow layer?

Most light sources can melt snow but some cannot....Melting.ItemMeltMelt RadiusSoul CampfireNo-ConduitYes3Glow LichenNo-GlowstoneYes335 more rows

How do you get the best snow in Minecraft?

Unlike the thin layer of snow that coats normal blocks when it snows in Minecraft, snow blocks won't melt when you put bright objects next to them, and they won't be destroyed by water - making them a pretty great building material.

Do snow layers melt in Minecraft?

Packed and solid ice will not be snowed on. This is stairs, fence, tracks, pressure plates, grass, carpet, trap doors, and both types of ice. You can also build a platform above the mural.



Roblox Deepwoken | How to properly fight snow knights (Get that layer 2 drip!)




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Images: Simon Berger, Oleksandr Pidvalnyi, Zeeshaan Shabbir, Zeeshaan Shabbir